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Librello publishing house


Librello is an innovative open access academic publishing house based in Basel, Switzerland. Working on a membership basis, we decouple the payment from the publication and can afford a rigorous single-blind peer review process with no economic pressure. Authors are able to submit an unlimited number of manuscripts to all open access journals through an annual flat fee.

Latest publications

OF
Werner J. Zollitsch
Department of Sustainable Agricultural Systems, BOKU-University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Australia
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Publication Date: 3 December 2018
 
Abstract: "Nutrition and Feeding of Organic Poultry" is a reference book for producers, advisory personnel, teachers, students and technical experts who are searching for sound information on the basics of nutrition, feed characteristics, practical diet formulation and the impact of nutrition on productivity, health and welfare of organic poultry.

CiS
Kyoko Takahashi 1, * , Shogo Kudo 1 , Eigo Tateishi 2 , Norikazu Furukawa 1 , Joakim Nordqvist 2 and Doreen Ingosan Allasiw 1
1 Graduate Program in Sustainability Science - Global Leadership Initiative, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Japan
2 Department of Urban Studies, Malmö University, Sweden
* Corresponding author
Views 438
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Publication Date: 5 November 2018
 
Abstract: Livability is a concept being applied to cities, even though it is vague. Worldwide, there are several livable city ranking schemes in use, which compare the livability of cities by making use of standardized indicator sets. The research presented here recognizes, as a point of departure, that each city is unique, implying that comparisons of cities by standardized categories only does not adequately reflect the reality of each city. A qualitative approach to identify context-specific categories of livability is proposed and employed to the case of Malmo ̈ in Sweden. Through interviews, nine context-specific categories were identified and visualized. The findings of the study demonstrate that a qualitative approach enables a more in-depth description of livability categories because it can capture and illustrate relationships among the categories. An explicit awareness of such relationships may provide a more holistic perspective to city officials and planners as they aim to improve the livability of their cities. The study concludes that a qualitative approach in identifying context-specific categories can complement existing assessment schemes and allow a better grasp of livability challenges to cities.

JoHS
Migrants Meet Europeans
doi: 10.12924/johs2018.14010024 | Journal of Human Security | 2018 | Volume 14 | Issue 1
Alexander K. Lautensach
School of Education, University of Northern British Columbia, Canada
Views 397
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Publication Date: 10 September 2018
 
Abstract: Seldom have I come across a book that incited in me conflicting reactions of such intensity. They stem from Murray’s reporting of facts—necessarily selective but shockingly effective; his conceptual analysis—eye-opening where it works but shallow and incomplete in other places; his conclusions—shattering mainstream platitudes and mis- conceptions but at times suffering from a narrowness of worldview and a dearth of historical perspective, not to mention a problematic interpretation of human security.

JoHS
Refugees & Violent Group Grievance
doi: 10.12924/johs2018.14010013 | Journal of Human Security | 2018 | Volume 14 | Issue 1
Jason Christensen
University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA
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Publication Date: 21 August 2018
 
Abstract:

Do refugee inflows have an effect on state fragility? In this article I examine whether refugee inflows, commonly associated in the literature with economic and cultural pressures, result in a more fragile state by means of increased violent group grievance. Violent group grievance captures a distinct form of intrastate violence, specifically small-scale hate crimes and ethnic group clashes associated with powerlessness and discrimination. The main hypothesis in this paper is that refugee inflows may increase violent group grievance.

I examine the effect of refugee inflows on the level of domestic violent group grievance using quantitative analyses based on original large-N datasets and cross-sectional longitudinal models to fill gaps in the literature on state fragility. This study controls for alternative explanations and covers the time period between 2006 and 2014. The analysis results confirm the main hypothesis of this paper.


OF
Stefano Orsini 1, * , Susanne Padel 1 and Nic Lampkin 1
1 The Organic Research Centre, Elm Farm, Berkshire, UK
* Corresponding author
Views 817
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Publication Date: 22 June 2018
 
Abstract: Organic farming is frequently associated with claims of more labour requirements than conventional. However, there is a fragmented knowledge about labour use on organic farms in terms of workload, nature and quality of employment provided. In the context of a growing organic demand and a need for more farmers to convert to reach policy targets set by many EU governments, it seems crucial to understand labour trends on organic farms and to what extent labour requirements may hinder the adoption of the organic methods. This paper presents a review of mainly European literature published since 2000. Studies presenting results by farm type usually indicate higher labour use per hectare on organic than conventional arable farms, whereas similar or lower labour use is reported on organic livestock farms, and the results are mixed for other farm types. We have identified in the existing literature two broad dimensions directly related with labour use, which need to be considered in comparative studies, namely farm structure (including farm type, but also farm size and diversification activities), and technical efficiency. These two broad dimensions give us insights into some more specific factors affecting labour use, and how labour is related with productivity and technical efficiency. Overall it appears that claims that labour requirements represent a concrete obstacle to the adoption of the organic methods need to be treated with caution, and more research is needed to understand the role of labour in farmers’ decision to convert to organic farming. The review of the nature and quality of employment indicates positive health effects related to higher satisfaction and lower exposure to pesticides in organic agriculture as the most important advantages for farm workers. Overall, there is limited research on whether the organic sector provides better opportunities in terms of job prospects, wages and employment of women.


CiS
Jeanette Silvin Blumroeder 1, * , Peter Ralph Hobson 2 , Uli Frank Graebener 3 , Joerg-Andreas Krueger 3 , Denis Dobrynin 4 , Natalya Burova 5 , Irina Amosa 5 , Susanne Winter 3 and Pierre Leonhard Ibisch 1
1 Centre for Econics and Ecosystem Management, Eberswalde University for Sustainable Development, Eberswalde, Germany
2 Centre for Econics and Ecosystem Management, Writtle University College, Writtle Chelmsford Essex, United Kingdom
3 WWF Germany, Berlin, Germany
4 WWF Russia, Arkhangelsk, Russia
5 Northern (Arctic) Federal University, Arkhangelsk, Russia
* Corresponding author
Views 876
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Publication Date: 14 June 2018
 
Abstract: The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) is a voluntary sustainability standard with global reach that has been developed to encourage responsible and sustainable forest management. Despite its broad appeal, there is little scientific assessment to substantiate the effectiveness of FSC in the boreal zone. In this study, an ecosystem-based and participatory approach was applied to a case study in the Arkhangelsk Region of the Russia Federation to assess the potential influence of the principles, criteria and indicators of the Russian FSC standard. An ECOSEFFECT theoretical plausibility analysis was conducted to evaluate the potential effectiveness of FSC in safeguarding the ecological integrity of the ecosystem. Besides spatial analysis and a field visitation, core elements of the methodological procedure were workshops with experts and stakeholders who directly contributed to knowledge mapping and analysis. The results of the study suggest FSC can potentially influence and improve forest management including monitoring and evaluation, foster the institutional capacity, and enhance knowledge on the impacts of forest management. Theoretically, FSC has a certain potential to reduce a range of anthropogenic threats to the ecosystem, such as large-scale deforestation and forest degradation, logging of High Conservation Value Forests, large size of clear-cuts, excessive annual allowable cuts, damage to trees during forest operations, and hydrological changes. However, human-induced fire is the only ecological stress that was assumed to be effectively tackled through a strong and positive influence of FSC. The results of the theoretical analysis with a semi-quantitative evaluation revealed the potential for FSC to generate much more effective outcomes for biodiversity by prudently targeting key ecological problems. The biggest problem is the large-scale clear-cutting practice, especially within IFL. These devastating practices are not promoted by, but are compliant with the current Russian FSC standard. This feeds doubts about the consistency of FSC practice and its credibility.

CiS
Ariane Krause 1, * and Johann Köppel 2
1 Center for Technology and Society, Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany
2 Environmental Assessment & Planning Research Group, Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany
* Corresponding author
Views 545
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Publication Date: 11 June 2018
 
Abstract:

To reduce the consumption of firewood for cooking and to realise recycling-driven soil fertility management, three projects in Northwest Tanzania aim to provide the local smallholder community with cooking and sanitation alternatives. The present study proposes an integrated approach to assess the sustainability of the small-scale cooking and sanitation technologies. Based on the multi-criteria decision support approach (MC(D)A), we developed a decision-specific, locally adapted, and participatory assessment tool: the Multi-Criteria Technology Assessment (MCTA). Pre-testing of the tailored tool was set up with representatives of Tanzanian and German partners of case study projects. From a methodological perspective, we conclude that the MCTA uses a set of relevant criteria to realise a transparent and replicable computational Excel-tool. The combination of MC(D)A for structuring the assessment with analytical methods, such as Material Flow Analysis, for describing the performance of alternatives is a promising path for designing integrated approaches to sustainability assessments of technologies. Pre-testing of the tool served as a proof-of-concept for the general design of the method. Future applications and adjustments of the MCTA require the inclusion of end-users, a reasonable and participatory reduction of criteria, and an increase of feedback loops and group discussions between participants and the facilitator to support a common learning about the technologies and thorough understanding of the perspectives of participants.


OF
Patrice A. Marchand
Institut Technique de l’Agriculture Biologique (ITAB), Paris, France
Views 543
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Publication Date: 17 May 2018
 
Abstract:

So called ’active substances’ (A.S.) which are allowed in Organic Production are regularly criticized for different reasons. Previously, although permitted in Organic Farming some substances were not approved under EU general plant protection products (PPP) regulation; therefore they were removed for their toxicity or exhibited characteristics (persistence, broad spectrum). Recent approbations under different new Articles of the EC regulation 1107/2009, gave rise to substances granted without maximum residue limits (MRL). We previously described approved basic substance (Art. 23) as potential candidates for organic farming; here we describe low risk substances (Art. 22) as new implements for substitution of controversial organic biopesticides and consequently as candidates for substitution (Art. 24).


OF
Thomas Felix Döring 1, 2
1 Editor-in-Chief of Organic Farming, Librello, Basel, Switzerland
2 Agroecology and Organic Farming Group, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany
Views 486
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Publication Date: 16 May 2018
 
Abstract: This year, organic farmers, advisors and researchers in the West of Germany celebrate the 25th anniversary of the foundation of an organic research and demonstration network. Established to support and improve organic farming systems, the network is funded by the federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia and is organized around 30 participating pilot farms called Leitbetriebe (‘leading farms’), with support from the university of Bonn and the Chamber of Agriculture For each of the practice-oriented research topics covered in this network, the typical five-year cycle of research involves a first year of experimental exploration and literature studies. The farmers participating in the pilot farm project discuss and select the topics of priority and review the research plans proposed by the scientists. This is followed by three years of systematic replicated field trials on several farms, and a final year of demonstration and evaluation, where the presentation of results is jointly done by farmers and researchers.

JoHS
A Review of ‘Human Insecurities in Southeast Asia’
doi: 10.12924/johs2018.14010011 | Journal of Human Security | 2018 | Volume 14 | Issue 1
Marcos Alan S. V. Ferreira
Department of International Relations, Federal University of Paraíba (UFPB), Brazil
Views 690
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Publication Date: 8 May 2018
 
Abstract: Debates on human insecurities are crucial in a changing world that witnesses high social inequality, degradation of environment, social tensions and a growing violation of human rights. Unfortunately, all these issues permeate the social structures of Southeast Asian countries in different ways. In that region civil society faces problems that are diverse, as seen in the political tensions in Thailand, the deterritorialization of indigenous peoples in Philippines and Malaysia, human rights violations in Myanmar, and numerous other challenges. Such setting demands different approaches from institutions and communities to overcome pending risks threatening their populations.



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