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Librello publishing house


Librello is an innovative open access academic publishing house based in Basel, Switzerland. Working on a membership basis, we decouple the payment from the publication and can afford a rigorous single-blind peer review process with no economic pressure. Authors are able to submit an unlimited number of manuscripts to all open access journals through an annual flat fee.

Latest publications

CiS
Cordula Ott
Centre for Development and Environment, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
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Publication Date: 27 February 2017
 
Abstract:

World leaders at the 2015 United Nations Sustainable Development Summit in New York have re- confirmed the relevance of sustainability as the guiding paradigm in countering the development and climate crisis of the Anthropocene. Recent decades however, have been characterized by confusion, contestations, and arbitrariness in defining the nature and pathways of sustainable development. Humanity must urgently find ways to unlock the potential of the sustainability paradigm and organize a sustainability transforma- tion. An emerging sustainability science community has already established considerable consensus on essential features of transformative science and research. Sustainability scholars are providing growing evidence that an emancipatory and democratic construction of sustainable development and more equitable, deliberative, and democratized knowledge generation are pivotal in tackling sustainability challenges. These findings are further underpinned by experiences gained in the Eastern and Southern Africa Partnership Programme (1999–2015)—a rare case of a long-term, transnational, and transdisciplinary research en- deavour already completed. The programme fulfilled the dual role which is compulsory in transformative research: It generated contextualized knowledge and innovation at the science–society interface while simultaneously securing meaningful participation and Southern agency in a co-evolutionary process. This paper offers insight into the programme’s adaptive structure and implementation processes, which fostered deliberation, capacity development, and joint programme navigation benchmarked against local needs and broader sustainability demands. The ESAPP experience confirms that, if taken as the overarching frame of reference for all actors involved, the sustainability paradigm unfolds its integrative and transformative power. It enables sustainability-oriented actors from all scientific and practical fields to seek consilience between differing development and innovation paradigms and synchronize their development agendas and research frameworks on behalf of societal co-production of knowledge and innovation. Accordingly, the sustainability paradigm has the power to guide development and innovation policy, and practice out of the current confusion and ineffectiveness.


CiS
Meg Parsons 1 , Johanna Nalau 2, 3, * and Karen Fisher 1
1 School of Environment, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
2 Griffith Climate Change Response Program (GCCRP), Griffith University, Nathan, Australia
3 Griffith Institute for Tourism (GIFT), Griffith University, Nathan, Australia
* Corresponding author
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Publication Date: 22 February 2017
 
Abstract: Indigenous knowledge (IK) is now recognized as being critical to the development of effective, equitable and meaningful strategies to address socio-ecological crises. However efforts to integrate IK and Western science frequently encounter difficulties due to different systems of knowledge production and underlying worldviews. New approaches are needed so that sustainability can progress on the terms that matter the most for the people involved. In this paper we discuss a case study from Aotearoa New Zealand where an indigenous community is in the process of renegotiating and enacting new indigenous-led approaches to address coupled socio-ecological crises. We reflect on novel methodological approaches that highlight the ways in which projects/knowledge are co-produced by a multiplicity of human and non-human actors. To this end we draw on conceptualizations of environmental ethics offered by indigenous scholars and propose alternative bodies of thought, methods, and practices that can support the wider sustainability agenda.

OF
Erin H. Roche 1, * , Ellen B. Mallory 1 and Heather Darby 2
1 University of Maine, School of Food and Agriculture, Orono, ME, USA
2 University of Vermont, Department of Plant and Soil Science, Burlington, VT, USA
* Corresponding author
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Publication Date: 13 February 2017
 
Abstract:

Achieving high grain yields and crude protein (CP) standards in organic winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is challenging because ensuring that adequate nitrogen (N) is available at key periods of wheat growth is difficult in organic systems. Split application regimes and in-season N management tests may improve organic production. In field trials conducted over four site-years in Maine and Vermont, USA, N application regimes were analyzed for their effects on organic winter wheat, N uptake, grain yield, and CP. Tiller density and tissue N tests were evaluated as in-season decision tools. Eight treatments arranged in a non-factorial design differed in terms of N application timing (pre-plant (PP), topdress at tillering (T1), and topdress at pre-stem extension (T2)) and N rate. Treatments were: (1) an untreated check, (2) pre-plant N at a low rate of 78 kg N ha−1 (PPL), (3) pre-plant N at a high rate of 117 or 157 kg N ha−1 (PPH), (4) T178, (5) PPL + T139, (6) PPL + T239, (7) PPH + T239, and (8) PPL + T139 +T239. Responses to N treatments were variable among site-years, however some common results were identified. The PP-only treatments increased grain yields more than they increased CP. The T178 and PPH + T239 treatments were the most effective at increasing yield and CP, compared with the PP-only treatments. Tiller density and tissue N tests were good predictors of grain yield (r = 0.52, p < 0.001) and CP (r = 0.75, p < 0.001) respectively. Future work should test in-season decision tools using a wider range of tiller densities, and topdress N rates against tissue N measurements.


CiS
Ellinor Isgren 1, 2 , Anne Jerneck 1, 2, * and David O'Byrne 1, 2
1 Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies (LUCSUS), Lund, Sweden
2 Lund University Centre of Excellence for Integration of Social and Natural Dimensions of Sustainability, Lund, Sweden
* Corresponding author
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Publication Date: 13 February 2017
 
Abstract: Sustainability Science is an emerging, transdisciplinary academic field that aims to help build a sustainable global society by drawing on and integrating research from the humanities and the social, natural, medical and engineering sciences. Academic knowledge is combined with that from relevant actors from outside academia, such as policy-makers, businesses, social organizations and citizens. The field is focused on examining the interactions between human, environmental, and engineered systems to understand and contribute to solutions for complex challenges that threaten the future of humanity and the integrity of the life support systems of the planet, such as climate change, biodiversity loss, pollution, and land and water degradation. Since its inception in around the year 2000, and as expressed by a range of proponents in the field, sustainability science has become an established international platform for interdisciplinary research on complex social problems [1]. This has been done by exploring ways to promote ‘greater integration and cooperation in fulfilling the sustainability science mandate’ [2]. Sustainability science has thereby become an extremely diverse academic field, yet one with an explicit normative mission. After nearly two decades of sustainability research, it is important to reflect on a major question: what critical knowledge can we gain from sustainability science research on persistent socio-ecological problems and new sustainability challenges?

OF
How Scientific Is Organic Farming Research?
doi: 10.12924/of2017.03010001 | Organic Farming | 2017 | Volume 3 | Issue 1
Thomas F. Döring 1, 2
1 Editor-in-Chief of Organic Farming, Librello, Basel, Switzerland
2 Faculty of Life Science, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany
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Publication Date: 13 February 2017
 
Abstract: Opening the third volume of this journal provides a re- newed opportunity to reflect on the current developments within the world of organic farming. As the most recent international data show, the organic sector continues to grow on a global scale, in terms of organic area, mar- ket share and number of producers [1]. Yet, for organic farming—as for any movement—expansion always en- tails the difficulty of maintaining identity. Achieving both, i.e. becoming ‘bigger’ and ‘better’, is the explicit goal of Organic 3.0 [2], the international initiative to advance and evolve organic farming. Launched in 2014, Organic 3.0 is now gaining increasing momentum, e.g. as a key topic at the upcoming Organic World Congress in India this autumn. The Organic 3.0 initiative proposes an am- bitious plan for promoting “a widespread uptake of truly sustainable farming systems” [2]. One of the suggested pathways to achieve the goals of Organic 3.0 is improved and extended research and development.

JoHS
Editorial Volume 13
doi: 10.12924/johs2017.13010001 | Journal of Human Security | 2017 | Volume 13 | Issue 1
Sabina Lautensach 1, 2, 3
1 Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Human Security, Librello, Basel, Switzerland
2 Human Security Institute, Canada
3 University of Northern British Columbia, Terrace, BC, V8G 4A2, Canada
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Publication Date: 9 February 2017
 
Abstract: Dear Reader, Those among us who have reached a certain age tend to have developed a long-term perspective and inclination to look back on individual years and to compare them for their respective blessings and injuries. In that sense, 2016 seems to take a special rank as an annus horribilis not just in my own assessment but in numerous commentaries we have come across over the past weeks. Foremost in our awareness featured the surprises: Nobody in my direct acquaintance foretold the Trump phenomenon or the Brexit decision. To find events equally unanticipated and far-reaching, one would have to go back to the 2007/8 financial crash, the 9/11 attacks, the dissolution of the USSR, or the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989.

CiS
Barry Ness 1, * and Ruben Zondervan 1, 2
1 Centre for Sustainability Studies, Lund University
2 Earth System Governance Project, Lund University
* Corresponding author
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Publication Date: 7 February 2017
 
Abstract: We are pleased to introduce the second special issue from Challenges in Sustainability, this time as a part of the Taskforce on Conceptual Foundations of Earth System Governance, an initiative by the Earth System Governance Project (ESG) (http://www.earthsystemgovernance.net/conceptual-foundations/). The ESG Project is a global research alliance. It is the largest social science research network in the field of governance and global environmental change. ESG is primarily a scientific effort but is also designed to assist policy responses to pressing problems of earth system transformation.

CiS
Ilenia Pierantoni 1, * and Massimo Sargolini 2
1 Terre.it, Spin-off of the University of Camerino, Sarnano, Italy
2 School of Architecture and Design, University of Camerino, Ascoli Piceno, Italy
* Corresponding author
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Publication Date: 27 January 2017
 
Abstract:

The relation between "urban" and "rural" has changed and developed over the last few decades. The present contribution focuses on how the relationship between these two entities has developed, highlighting how it corresponds to a growing complexity and interdependence among the two. Awareness has increased that to the extent that proper management of these interdependences can contribute to solve problems, increase economic performance and also make a contribution to a higher quality of life in and around urban areas. In this framework, green infrastructures and agriculture practices in urban areas are discussed. The contribution concludes by suggesting strategies and actions for the proper implementation of green infrastructures and urban agriculture practices at regional and local scales.


CiS
David Harnesk 1, 2
1 Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies, Lund, Sweden
2 Lund University Centre of Excellence for the Integration of the Social and Natural Dimensions of Sustainability, Lund, Sweden
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Publication Date: 12 December 2016
 
Abstract: The book “Energy and Transport in Green Transitions – Perspectives on Ecomodernity” deals with the societally and scientifically crucial topic of energy and climate change mitigation. The book starts by setting high ambitions as the authors attempt “to go beyond both the extremism of the anti-capitalist critique and the radical enthusiasm of techno-economic positivism” in their exploration to find ways to resolve political, economic and technological entanglements “to boost a greener economy and culture”. It aims to so through a regional comparative study that looks at mature Western economies, the rapidly developing China, and the developing economies in sub-Saharan Africa. The authors present an excellent descriptive historical review for those interested in the broader picture of energy production and automobile sector in the regions addressed. However, in an attempt to cover as much ground as possible while assuring "maximum accessibility”, the authors' explanation of the dynamics of change involved is not conveyed in an analytically convincing manner.

JoHS
John Michael Quinn V
Prague Center for Global Health, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic
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Publication Date: 15 September 2016
 
Abstract: Author and Scholar Seug-Whan Choi's "New Explorations into International Relations: democracy, foreign investment, terrorism and conflict" serves as a nexus of interdisciplinary analysis and findings rooted in evidenced based research. Indeed, the author set out to challenge and test traditional international relations (IR) theories by implementing rigorous scientific methods in an attempt to produce policy recommendations and encourage a frameshift in methodological approaches. One underlying theme that recurs throughout this work is the requirement for rigorous statistical analysis and education in the field of political science. This has already begun and a re-emphasis is encouraged and greatly welcomed.




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